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Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt is one of the two national pavilions representing Romania at the 55th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia.

 

New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research

Palazzo Correr (Campo Santa Fosca) Cannaregio 2214, 30121 Venice

June, 1st – November, 24th 2013

Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 – 18:00; Monday closed

 



curator's advice-35






Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An attempt is conceived as a center for analyzing minor histories that have been suspended behind major events. From June 1st until November 24th, the exhibition will become a temporary institution, a model for a center of reflection and thinking about the relevance of art history and visuality. It abounds in information, relentlessly combining historical periods with images, personal stories, myths, names, memories.

 

The works of art have been selected by using the method introduced by Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717 – 1768), and applied when evaluating the Greek, Roman, Etruscan and Egyptian antiquity, mindful of the fact that historical forces and the cultural climate have influenced art history, taste and aesthetic value.

If I were to refer to Horst Bredekamp’s conception of the quality of art and societal living, there is also that dose of freedom that can define the production of art in a certain moment. Bredekamp finely theorizes Winckelman’s thinking about the evolution of art history, based on the causality of nature – antique sculpture – work of art – machine.

 

You, as the beholder accessing the Reflection Center for Suspended Histories, are confronted with several visual choices that connect these three elements: necessity, beauty and redundancy, which I translate into: the script – the discourse – the climax. You must engage in a direct dialogue with the works, choosing the suitable mental experience for you.

I can only attempt to suggest to you three possible ways of viewing the exhibition;

you can either choose one way only,

or decide to go through all three in their given order,

but never randomly.

In the first few years of the third millennium, Lia Perjovschi published, under the auspices of CAA (Center for Art Analysis), the subjective Art History. From Modernism to present day. Art and its context. Lia Perjovschi had chosen works of art and historical moments acknowledged by art theory as monumental, transforming them into a visual thinking apparatus. By using subjectivity, an analytic tool developed in ancient Greece, and based on her belief in “Grand Theory” – (to represent all

 knowledge and explain everything), the artist presents an exploration into the open body of art history, starting with the year 1826 and ending with the year 2004. Her art history recollects forgotten stances, correlates memories, people … She thus states her belief that “art tends to give shape and weight to the most invisible processes. As a medium of experience – by striving to shatter the logic of the spectacle, art restores the world to us as an experience to be lived”.

 

Karolina-Bregula-44

 

 

 

 

 

Imagine you enter the Reflection Center for Suspended Histories, walking straight ahead, and entering into the second exhibition room – this is the space dedicated to Karolina Breguła’s work. For the next minutes, you will watch the trailer of her film, that discusses the potentiality of immolating art in a world where art has become redundant and non-revolutionary.

You can hear the voice of a curator repeating an opening discourse announcing that an art space will suspend the exhibiting activity in order to focus on preserving the art works. Two possible questions arise – whether to accept a new revolution in art that will create new problems to be solved, or whether to let art disappear as it is no longer needed.

 

 

Karolina Breguła, Fire-Followers , video, 48’46’’, 2013

Apparatus22-43

 


In order to increase the dilemma posed by the film, try to further play with your imagination and move toward the desk positioned by the entrance in the exhibition, then choose a computer and access the questionnaire evaluating the degree of fake in your life. The 29 questions are accompanied by a collection of collages, but also by randomly

generated Google imagery depicting extreme social economics that epitomize the consumer in search for a historical image of her/ himself. I am still wondering if art history is real, if we can differentiate the fake from the real, if the fake is a spell put on the real.

 

 

 

Apparatus 22, Portraying Simulacra,
object and digital questionnaire, 2012 – 2013

Apparatus 22_Portraying Simulacra_diamond

Irina-Botea_Nicu-Ilfoveanu negru-46

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial houses are by definition keepers of historical images, reconverting the past in order to keep the personality of the initial inhabitants of the house alive. Time stands still, juicy stories flow, intimate details are being revealed. The custodian of the house is the curator, the story-teller, and the care-taker of the establishment. And all of that in a museum format, following a museum programme. Therefore confusion arises – after all, isn’t the custodian the actual inhabitant of the house?

What are the consequences of appropriating personal histories? Parallel histories are being generated as a way of preserving memory; the spoken word is essential as a gateway to collectible memory. At the end of the lane especially adapted for the projection of this film, the viewer is invited to further meditate on the historical condition and the various projections of reality.

 

 

 

 

Irina Botea and Nicu Ilfoveanu, Film Postale,
16 mm film transferred digitally, 34’24’’, 2013

Irina Botea_Nicu Ilfoveanu_Film Postale_documentation1

Olivia-Mihaltianu-48

 

 

 

 

 

Still enshrouded in the atmosphere created by the narratives around memorial houses, one can find in their proximity the smoking room, a simulacrum of the golden room of Queen Marie of Romania. The original golden room was built in a castle in Transylvania at the beginning of the 20th century under the influence of the Viennese Secession, in a time when psychoanalysis was reshaping our perception of mental processes. Queen Marie contributed to the design of the palace, planning this special

room for herself, as a locus for reflection and introspection, as a space for dreaming, desire, and forbidden pleasures. The visitor entering the smoking room in the exhibition takes a seat at the “golden” table placed underneath a Murano chandelier, facing the agitation of the street; the reflective history of Queen Marie is juxtaposed with the shifting identity of the Palazzo Correr, with the expanding Venetian history, and with the history of the Venice Biennale.

 

 

Olivia Mihălţianu, Smoking Room,
installation (golden wallpaper, gilded furniture, Murano chandelier, matchboxes, monitor), 2013

Olivia Mihălţianu_ Smoking Room_1

Sebastian Moldovan-42

 

 

 

 

 

Opposite to the smoking room, a complex sanitary installation colonizes one corner of the Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. It is a site-specific work consisting of prehensile sanitary pipes. The installation offers a rigid system that allows us to analyze our way of seeing and behaving in relation to a work of art. The brutality of the construction may

suck the viewer into a personal structure, while the visual contact is compulsory. The artist constructs each part of this environment with care and renders a horizontal time in a humanist atmosphere, revealing a scent of nomadic desire that pushes aside memories, feelings and permanence.

 

 

 

Sebastian Moldovan, Side-works. Sanitary Installation,

site-specific installation (PVC pipes painted with five layers of oil paint and one layer of water paint), various dimensions, 2013

 

Sebastian Moldovan_ Side-works Sanitary Installation_3

Adi-Matei-47

 

 

 

 

 

In a hidden corner, underneath the old staircase, lies the image of the bird endlessly flying in a room, displayed as a curiosity – one can only look through a hole and see the image like in a 16th century peep-show. Suspension, captivity and expectation are combined in a spirited work that comments on the evolution of visual perception.

To a certain a degree, it stresses the desire for visual entertainment that has existed since the beginning of times, encompassing a dialectics of imagery – from the search for perspective in drawing and painting in the 15th century to the condition of the motion picture in the 19th century.

 

 

 

Adi Matei, Bird in a room,
HD video, Blu-ray disk, 26’’loop/ 32’, 2012

Adi Matei_Bird in a room_1

Around the year 1947, André Malraux transformed his obsession of collecting photographic images of art works from different periods and various areas of the globe into what he called “museum without walls”, musée imaginaire. In her text Postmodernism’s Museum Without Walls, Rosalind Krauss calls this visual exercise another way of writing “modernism,” that is, of transcoding the aesthetic notions upon which modern art was built: the idea of art as autonomous and autotelic, the sense of it as self-valuable, the view of it that had been summarized as l’art

pour l’art. In her view, Malraux’s vision activates the conceptual space of the human faculties: imagination, cognition, judgment.
Malraux’s genuine quest into incipient visuality had suggested that we are surrounded by imagery, and every one of us has the capacity to fusion with different styles, with various modes of creation, of interpretation, thus opening infinite possibilities of making the thinking about art universal, rather than invasive at the physical level.

Sebastian Moldovan-42

 

 

Hanging on the edge of the exhibition space, the “sanitary installation” is a schizophrenic art piece that unifies sight and touch, being with us for only a brief moment; that is the moment of observation, when the viewer registers the work. As you enter the space, it is hard to detect it, visually it is quite inefficient, physically it can be a strong presence. But still, why would such a visible sanitary installation be accepted in an exhibition

space? Or rather, why would an exhibition be organized in the proximity of such an elaborate sanitary installation? Apart from this biased situation, there is the dual meaning of the work: a network of PVC piping which usually collects the waste from above, grows and spreads like a tree (of knowledge)…

 

 

 

Sebastian Moldovan, Side-works. Sanitary Installation,
site-specific installation (PVC pipes painted with five layers of oil paint and one layer of water paint), various dimensions, 2013

Sebastian Moldovan_ Side-works Sanitary Installation_2

Apparatus22-43

 

 

 

 

 

There is nothing more quintessentially ‘contemporary’ than the acknowledgement of fake and the capability of playing with it. With regard to the questionnaire Portraying Simulacra, this expanding inventory of fake, Apparatus 22 declared: “Although mimicking a scientific marketing-cum-sociological questionnaire, it bears very different roles and visual forms: the focus is not on the results of the survey, but on the actual answering of the questions.

It questions the limits of such a research tool when issuing new knowledge. The process of going through it becomes the pretext for making the respondents think of the intricate and profound implications fake is insinuating in their lives. Furthermore, the overwhelming, almost hysterical layer of imagery that is added to each question opens up potentialities for cross-references as well as asyndetic accumulation on the recurring motif of fake.”

 

 

Apparatus 22, Portraying Simulacra,
object and digital questionnaire, 2012 – 2013

Apparatus 22_Portraying Simulacra_printscreen

Adi-Matei-47

 

 

The Wunderkammer, a contraption of the Renaissance, had demonstrated the desire for the display of objects in such an order that it would depict a certain state or send a message to the initiated visitor. The beholder was given a destiny, and the arranger of the objects was awarded the responsibility of such an act that folds and unfolds the mind. It is a viral process, implying the visual contamination of the participants, and the leap back in time, where we see a bird folding and unfolding its wings

in a room. The perpetual movement of the bird and the fact that the image unfolds itself to the eye of the viewer remind me of how Gilles Deleuze was describing “the fold” in his book about Foucault: “The fold is the general topology of thought… ‘inside’ space is topologically in contact with the ‘outside’ space… and brings the two into confrontation at the limit of the living present”.

 

 

 

Adi Matei, Bird in a room,
HD video, Blu-ray disk, 26’’loop/ 32’, 2012

Adi Matei_Bird in a room_2

Karolina-Bregula-44

 

 

As nowadays museum storage rooms are over-saturated with art, what is the best option for preserving the art works? Should they be classified according to their importance, should their revolutionary content matter? The film shows how a community is prepared to sacrifice works of art in order to live peacefully.

Art is at risk of becoming a verbal convention that is being separated from its creator, of losing physicality in front of conformity and institutional hegemony. Still, imagination and visual memory prevail.

 

 

 

 

Karolina Breguła, Fire-Followers,
video, 48’46’’, 2013

Karolina Bregula_Fire Followers_still3

Irina-Botea_Nicu-Ilfoveanu negru-46

 

 

Iulia Hasdeu, Nicolae Bălcescu or Cecilia Cuţescu-Storck – three Romanian personalities with flamboyant destinies, usually part of documentaries about the tragic fate of the woman writer, or the national sentiment around the year 1848, or the emancipation of the self. There is so much spirit when talking about historical personalities, that reality is usually

distorted, and imagination replaces biographical gaps or emotional dramas. Film Postale reconstitutes the antagonism between anonymity and representation by interviewing the custodians of the houses once inhabited by these iconic personalities – Iulia Hasdeu, Nicolae Bălcescu and Cecilia Cuţescu-Storck.

 

 

Irina Botea and Nicu Ilfoveanu, Film Postale,
16 mm film transferred digitally, 34’24’’, 2013











Olivia-Mihaltianu-48

 

 

The Imaginative Parcours of Knowledge in the Reflection Center for Suspended Histories finishes in the smoking room. The smoking room functions like a time machine – in an environment built for reflection, with comfort induced by the neat, golden surfaces, the visitor returns in time, to the advent of smoking in public for women.

Because the smoking room’s ability lies in determining one’s personal interests through one’s passions and dreams, there is a harmonious individualization of actions while entering it, combined with the desire for exploration and desacralization.

 

 

 

Olivia Mihălţianu, Smoking Room,

installation (golden wallpaper, gilded furniture, Murano chandelier, matchboxes, monitor), 2013

Olivia Mihălţianu_ Smoking Room_2

The chronological pathway is an accessible method in approaching any social phenomenon, as it provides order, reasoning, and the possibility to archive information. Where art history is concerned, Winckelmann relied on chronology to structure his iconographical research that was mixing

styles, composing a capital for copies, passing from location to location based on the studied artefacts (i.e. from Villa Borghese to Villa Albani to Villa Pamphili), describing images and interpreting fragments, building space for imagination.

Adi-Matei-47

 

 

 

 

 

Imagine that you enter the Reflection Center for Suspended Histories, cross the first room, and enter the second one, allowing the space to unfold itself in front of you. When entering the room, immediately turn to your right, and look through the hole in the wall. You will see the interior of a baroque room slightly deviating into Neoclassicism – the floor and the

ceiling are made out of cases, the walls are imprinted with identical rectangular shapes, two windows are widely open, and in the middle of this articulated environment, which concentrates a linear Renaissance perspective, a parrot is flipping its wings in an infinite movement, defying space and time.

 

 

Adi Matei, Bird in a room,
HD video, Blu-ray disk, 26’’loop/ 32’, 2012

Adi Matei_Bird in a room_3

Olivia-Mihaltianu-48

 

 

 

 

 

The smoking room becomes an epicentre of reflection, combined with an invisible action that is of smoking. From a historical perspective, smoking is an instrument for thinking and for marking one’s own space in public; in the contemporary framework, smoking is not permitted in public spaces.

But the match-box inscribed with the name “Smoking Room”, left unattended on the golden surface of the table, can be taken by the visitor from the exhibition space, and carried to the proximate place for smoking, thus transgressing the location and inducing expectation.

 

 

Olivia Mihălţianu, Smoking Room,

installation (golden wallpaper, gilded furniture, Murano chandelier, matchboxes, monitor), 2013

Olivia Mihălţianu_ Smoking Room_3

Karolina-Bregula-44

 

 

 

 

 

Fire as a concept involves accident, natural distortion, the metamorphosis of form, and the principle of recreation. Behind most of the memorable fires in the history of humanity stands an aesthetical reason. One of the most outstanding fires in history is the Great Fire of Rome, in 64 AD;

nobody really knows whether it was Nero who started it or whether it was arson. Literature identifies Nero as the primary suspect, considering his desire of building Rome according to his own principles.

 

 

 

Karolina Breguła, Fire-Followers,
video, 48’46’’, 2013

Karolina Bregula_Fire Followers_still5

Irina-Botea_Nicu-Ilfoveanu negru-46

 

 

 

 

 

Film Postale is a new commission for the Biennale, that functions like a system for archiving the memory of the past combined with the memory of the momentum. It is a story about the sublime of the human mind that

can act as a metaphorical stream of ideas, feelings, reconversions of the self, carried out with a dose of institutional indifference, and a desire to reach a horizontal balance with heterogeneous elements.

 

 

Irina Botea and Nicu Ilfoveanu, Film Postale,
16 mm film transferred digitally, 34’24’’, 2013

Botea_Nicu Ilfoveanu_Film Postale_documentation2

Apparatus22-43

 

 

 

 

 

In the 17th century, there was a habit of creating simulacra and automatons with moving features and free-will (but already Homer and later on Aristotle had been preoccupied with such contraptions). These organisms were derivative of the occult philosophies of the time, combining mathematics, natural sciences, the battle between good and

evil, and the belief of people in an afterlife. In a transcendental note, Apparatus 22 tries to draw a contour for fake in the questionnaire, by asking: Is there fake in afterlife?, with four possible answers to chose from: afterlife is unreal; impossible association of terms; nothing is fake in afterlife; it could be mysteriously at home.

 

 

Apparatus 22, Portraying Simulacra,
object and digital questionnaire, 2012 – 2013

Apparatus 22_Portraying Simulacra_printscreen 26

Sebastian Moldovan-42

 

 

 

 

 

A contemporary, unlimited version of the concept of vanitas, this drawing in space raises the discussion around the passing of time, the irrelevance of earthly actions, and the frailty of the human condition. At its core, it is a

game of creation in which the artist takes over an element from his surrounding that he artifies, and then transforms into a static spatial piece, as an argument for invisibility and transparent logic.

 

 

Sebastian Moldovan, Side-works. Sanitary Installation,
site-specific installation (PVC pipes painted with five layers of oil paint and one layer of water paint), various dimensions,2013

Sebastian Moldovan_ Side-works Sanitary Installation_1




Artists-31

 

 

 

Apparatus 22 is a multidisciplinary art collective initiated by current members Erika Olea, Maria Farcaş, Dragoş Olea and late artist Ioana Nemeş (1979, Bucharest – 2011, NY) in January 2011. Apparatus 22 works with ideas and actions that will ignite the critical potential of clothing and fashion and that will unveil outstanding narratives on such topics. A string of very diverse works (installations, performances, texts etc.) shapes their practice, in which reality is mixed with fiction and storytelling merges with a critical approach in which they draw knowledge and experience from design, sociology, literature and economics. Apparatus 22 participated in exhibitions and festivals at MUMOK, Vienna(AT), Museion, Bolzano(IT), The Contemporary Art Gallery of the Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu(RO), MAK, Vienna(AT), Steirischer Herbst, Graz (AT), Drodesera Festival, Dro (IT), Young Artists Biennial, Bucharest(RO), Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart(DE), Salonul de Proiecte, Bucharest (RO), TIME MACHINE BIENNIAL OF CONTEMPORARY ART in Konjic (BIH) etc.

 

Irina Botea has been engaged in an art practice that uses multiple media – digital video, film, video installation, performance, and photography to inspect the present socio-political dynamics and the possibilities of their transformation. Her work combines reenactment strategies with auditions and elements of direct cinema and cinéma vérité in order to explore the role that trauma, history, language, and music play in the formation of the individual and the community. Solo and group exhibitions were shown at: New Museum, New York (US); MUSAC – Museum of Contemporary Art of Castilia and Leon(ES); Pompidou Centre, Paris (FR); National Gallery Jeu de Paume, Paris (FR); Kunsthalle Winterthur (CH); Reina Sofia National Museum, Madrid (ES); Gwangju Biennale 2010 (KR); U -Turn Quadriennial, Copenhagen (DK); Kunstforum, Vienna (AT); Foksal Gallery, Warsaw (PL); Argos Center for Art and Media, Brussels (BE); MNAC (National Museum of Contemporary Art), Bucharest (RO); Museum of Contemporary Art, Szczecin (PL); Center for Contemporary Art Ujazdowki Castle, Warsaw (PL).

 

Karolina Breguła creates installations, happenings, video and photography. She has graduated from the National Film, Television and Theatre School in Łódź, where she is now working on her doctoral thesis. She has performed and exhibited in galleries such as the National Museum in Warsaw, Poland, the Centre for Contemporary Art in Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw (PL); the Centre for Contemporary Art Łaźnia in Gdańsk (PL); the Kalmar Museum of Art in Kalmar (SE); and the Real Art Ways in Hartford (US). She has been awarded the Samsung Art Master prize, the Polish Ministry of Culture Scholarship, the Visegrad Scholarship and the Młoda Polska Scholarship. She has been nominated for the Views 2013 art award. In her recent works she has been confronting the subject of the reception of art. She is researching non-professional art receivers and their relation to modern art, looking for the place of artistic creation in today’s society and the role that art heritage can play in the contemporary world. Building the meanings and self-analysis of culture has become the direction of her latest artistic activity.

 

Olivia Mihălţianu works on long-term projects which evolve and adapt to different social, cultural, political and economic situations in global and local contexts, in which the photographic, film and video image play a key role. The projects engender personal and collective imagery, going back and forth between still and moving images. Recent personal and group shows: Winyan Kipanpi Win/ The Woman Who Was Waited For, Kunsthalle Krems, Factory, (AT) in 2013; From the Backstage, Salonul de Proiecte, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest (RO) in 2012; Where Do We Go From Here?, Secession, Vienna (AT) in 2010; Wakefield Meadows, Pavilion Unicredit, Bucharest (RO) in 2009/2010; 4th Young Artists’ Biennial, Bucharest (RO); Anyone But Me, Anywere But Here, The Contemporary Art Gallery of the Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu (RO) in 2008; Social Cooking Romania, NGBK, Berlin(DE) in 2007; formate/moving patterns, Kunsthalle, Vienna (AT) in 2004.

Nicu Ilfoveanu, born in 1975 in Piteşti (RO), lives and works in Bucharest (RO). His distinguishing mark as an artist is a low-tech approach to mediums such as photography, film and self-publishing. His work is characterized by the interplay between the personal and documentary approaches, between the sublime and the trivial, between evidence and hidden subjects. He has recently exhibited at FotoFestival, Mannheim-Ludwigshafen-Heidelberg (DE) and PHotoEspaña, Cuenca (ES).

 

Adi Matei was born in 1980 in Galaţi (RO). He lives and works in Cluj-Napoca (RO). He completed his studies at the Cluj-Napoca University of Art and Design in 2004 and obtained a Master’s degree in 2006. In 2008 he participated in the Bucharest Biennale 3 (RO) and the Oberbayerischer Bezirk Residency in Freising (DE). He was the recipient of the Henkel Prize Romania in 2010, with his video work Tower (Cigarettes box plastic wrapper tower collapse). In 2011 he took part in the exhibition I AM HURT at the Gallerie Jan Colle in Gent (BE), in the Romanian Cultural Institute (ICR) artist-in-residence in Paris (FR) and the residency of the Centre for contemporary art at Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw (PL). In 2012 he received the Constantin Brancusi Scholarship at the Cite des Arts Paris (FR), participated in the IN OUT Festival in Gdansk (PL), the third Moscow International Biennale for Young Art (RU). Additionally, he staged his first solo show, MOON SHUFFLE, at The Contemporary Art Gallery of the Brukenthal National Museum Sibiu (RO) and took part in the Krinzinger Projecte Residency in Petomihalyfa (HU) and Kulturkontakt’s AIR Program in Vienna (AT).

 

Working in various artistic media has naturally placed Sebastian Moldovan in the proximity of installation, a form of artistic expression that opens many possibilities in approaching space and entails the identification with certain theoretical directions. His solo exhibitions – Almost Censored at the Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu (RO) in 2005, Artist Survival Kit at the Jan Dhaese Gallery, Gent (BE) in 2010 or Dreamcather at the Contemporary Art Gallery of the Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu (RO) in 2011 – discussed the role of art institutions and failure in the art world. In the past few years, Sebastian Moldovan has been invited to participate in several group exhibitions, where he has produced a series of site-specific installations: Global Without Globalization, Salonul de Proiecte, Bucharest (RO) in 2012; Household Goods, Haifa Mediterranean Biennale of Contemporary Art Haifa (IL) in 2010; New History, Kharkov Art Museum, Kharkov (UA) in 2009; Dada East? The Romanians of Cabaret Voltaire, Cabaret Voltaire, Zürich (CH) in 2006. At the moment, Sebastian Moldovan is pursuing his constant research on the everyday life rituals with specific interest in the logic of plants, questioning basic actions like breathing (a recurrent theme in his works), survival, beginning and ending or the passing of time.

 




Curator-32

 

 

 

 

Anca Mihuleţ is a freelance curator based in Sibiu and Bucharest (RO). As a curator, Anca Mihuleţ has been supporting young Romanian artists to research on topics such as the implications of knowledge, history, margins or landscape, and produce new works of art that talk about these issues. Starting with 2011, Anca Mihuleţ has been interested in questioning and theorizing various curatorial contexts, by participating in several fellowhips and residencies – at the National Museum of Contemporary Art Seoul (KR), at the Seoul Art Space Geumcheon (KR) or the Curatorial Intensive seminar on curating institutions held by Independent Curators International at the Ullens Art Center, Beijing (CN). Between 2006 and 2013, together with Liviana Dan, Anca Mihuleţ has curated the exhibition program of the The Contemporary Art Gallery of the Brukenthal National Museum in Sibiu, with projects such as: Teodor Graur – 3 X The Totalitarian, The Modernist, The Balkanian Museum; Adi Matei – Moon Shuffle; Napoleon Tiron – solo exhibition; The Congress Dances. The Elephants Have

Gone Crazy – a collective project of Micha Payer & Martin Gabriel, Katharina Gruzei, Andrea Winkler; Matei Bejenaru – Projects 2008 – 2010; Mihai Olos – solo exhibition; Pavel Brăila – Chișinău – Sibiu – Brăila. In 2011, together with Apparatus 22 and Olivia Mihălţianu, she worked on the research project and exhibition Situated Knowledge. I Follow Rivers of Thoughts at the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanist Research in Venice, (IT). Since 2010, Anca Mihuleţ is a founding member of the Curators’ Network, a mobile curatorial network created between five institutions: Hablar en Arte, Madrid (ES); Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu (RO); Kunsthalle Exnergasse, Vienna (AT); Studio of Young Artists Association, Budapest (HU); Foundation for Visual Arts, Krakow (PL). At the moment, she is preparing an exhibition of Romanian and Korean art, scheduled to take place in 2015 at the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Seoul (KR).




commissioners-59






Commissioner

Monica Morariu was born in Bucharest (RO) in 1974. She studied visual arts at the National Art University in Bucharest and received her BA in 1998 and her MA in 2006. Since 1995 she has been organizing and participating in group and solo exhibitions. She is a PhD candidate in visual arts at The National Art University in Bucharest. Since 2009 she has acted asthe commissioner of the Romanian participation at the International Art and Architecture Exhibitions – La Biennale di Venezia. Since 2006 she has been working with Romania’s Ministry of Culture.


Deputy Commissioner

Cristian Alexandru Damian was born in Cluj (RO) in 1980. He studied Iconography at the Babeş-Bolyai University in Cluj, from which he graduated in 2003. He received master degrees in Italian Culture in 2004 and Art History in 2006. In the same year he is granted the “Nicolae Iorga“ scholarship by the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research in Venice. He is currently a PhD student at the Babeş-Bolyai University in Cluj. In 2010, 2011 and 2012 he acted as deputy commissioner for the Romanian participation at the 12th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. He currently lives in Venice where he works at the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research.




publications

 

 

 

 

Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An attempt NEWSPAPER

Paper-An attempt_Cover 1 ordonat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content:

A guide for reading the exhibition conceived by the curator, a series of interviews with participating artists: Apparatus 22 interviewed by Luigi Fassi, Irina Botea and Nicu Ilfoveanu interviewed by Jürgen Tabor, Karolina Breguła interviewed by Agnieszka Sural, Adi Matei interviewed by Anca Rujoiu, Olivia Mihălţianu interviewed by Bettina Spörr, Sebastian Moldovan interviewed by Borbála Szalai and credits.

 

Available from May
Distribution: in the exhibition and by request; free publication
Format: 310 x 420 mm, 32 pages, black-white
Running: 15 000 copies

Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An attempt READER

souvenirs1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content:

Essays and interviews with and by Anca Mihuleţ, Zdenka Badovinac, Liviana Dan, Patrick D. Flores, Ioana Vlasiu and Monika Wucher.

 

Available from October
Distribution: in the exhibition and by request; price to be confirmed
Format: TBC
Running: TBC

 

image credit: Mark Salvatus, Souvenirs (photos of my uncle from his last voyage as a seaman, 2008-2010), 100 Photographs, C-print, 2013

 

 

1. insights-65

 

titlu irina nicu


 

“Sweltering heat, the sultriness became unbearable in the summer of 2010, which was almost scorching!

I was asked by a group of documentary filmmakers consisting of three people – a woman and two men in the prime of their lives – to be their guide to the sheepfolds in the mountains, on the south slope of Găina Mountain (The Hen Mountain). These sheepfolds are threatened with extinction or have already disappeared during the final decades of the last century.

 

 

imagine 1

The team that worked for the film Picturesque, from left to right: Nicu Ilfoveanu (sitting), Mr. Nelu (standing), Toni Cartu (standing and holding the camera) and Irina Botea (jumping)

 

Irina, the leader of the group, is from Bucharest. Her parents came from the southern part of the countyof Moldova all the way down to the banks of the Dâmbovița River in Bucharest. She is a brown-haired, chubby, happy girl, bursting with energy, interested in discovering novelty in the midst of everyday occurrences, in seeing and immortalizing as much as she canin snapshots. This way, when she goes back to the University of Chicago, where she teaches courses on media and communication by means of the camera lens, she will have somethingto show her students.

 

Nicu, Irina’s assistant, a clever and talkative guy, who has trodden the winding roads of old Europe, a joker when the occasion arises – always ready to pour you a “strong” shot – is the one driving the 15.000 euro double traction “Japanese”, not missing one ditch inthe narrow mountain roads, filled with holes andboulders. Crammed into one another inside the car, we feel as though we were rocking on a boat, caught by a raging typhoon and set adrift on the waves of a tempestuous sea.

 

Nevertheless, Nicu the helmsman was the one who wouldalways carry us towards the shore we longed for!

 

I was about to find out that the guy was madly in love with a brown-haired girl living all the way over on the banks of the Seine. Nicu wanted her close to him as soon as possible, as a life partner, and he was looking forward, with bated breath, for the shooting to be over so that he could fly to the “city of lights” to see his beloved once again, the one with whom he could talk on the phone for hours.

 

As for Toni, the tallest member of the crew, he wasthe cameraman, “the man with the moving camera”, the one who stroveto fulfill all the rigors concerning his job, but also Irina’s demands, while at the same time collaborating with Nicu.

 

Rather the quiet type, perhaps thinking about a Dulcinea – since he is single, Toni looks for the most adequate shooting angles in order to capture quality footage that would speak for itself, making full use of the knowledge gathered during his studies, as well as of the possibilities entailed by the equipment he is skillfully handling.

 

Although he doesn’t talk much, when he opens his mouth you realize that the man has life experience and does not waste his breath on foolish things.

 

We quicklybecame friends, we were all sociable characters with an open nature and in spite of the age difference between us we got along really well, like siblings,duringthe two weeks of wandering…

*

- Good, I’m glad that’s over, ’cause I’m done! What, you want me to read the whole thing?

- No, it’s perfect!

- Huh?

- It’s perfect this way!

- Here! Shall I close the folder?

- Close the folder for the moment.

- Right away. How come?

- What page is it, though?

- 137.

- When you’ll read the book, you’ll remember.”

*

This is how Mr. Nelu, the main character of the first film about hidden Romanian landscapes and histories made by Irina Botea, Nicu Ilfoveanu and Toni Cartu described them. Mr. Nelu served as a guide in the Apuseni Mountains, in areas once used for gold mining. His stories were at the core of the film Picturesque(2010 – 2012) that had discussed various ideas of beauty at the conjunction between an abandoned industrial landscape and human life that must find ways to move forward.

 

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Mr. Nelu explaining in front of the camera why a natural scenery can be or cannot be picturesque

 

In 2013, Irina Botea and Nicu Ilfoveanu reunited to makeFilm Postale, a special commission for the exhibition Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt, and sharing some features with Picturesque: The custodians of three memorial houses in Romania talk in front of the camera about the personalities that used to live in those houses – a poetess, a historian, and a painter. Three different people living in three different decades of the 19th and 20th century, but interested in spiritual living and the welfare of an idealized Romanian nation.

*

Fred Mecklenburg from Chicago, Illinois, agreed to share with us some of his opinions on the latest oeuvre of Irina and Nicu. Fred dubshimself a Marxist-Humanist revolutionary activist and a poet. He met Irina through the Next Objectivists poetry group in Chicago; in her work, he recognizes the world-spirit as it struggles to consciousness, post-1989. Mecklenburg considers that as a filmmaker, she recognizes the need to examine cross-sections of light and freedom while the walls stand, so that we may live a better life when they’re gone. Below, you can read Fred Mecklenburg’s freshly condensed statement:

“For the creators, some thoughts on history and memory in Irina Botea’s and Nicu Ilfoveanu’s Film Postale:

 

1) Love the use of the black screen. Also the sort of flares… exposures?… I don’t know the right term, but they were very helpful.

 

These aspects added a lot to the film. The light effects felt disintegrative, like time, like decay, like forgetfulness, which is all very fecund and overgrows memory. But the black screen with voices was better still.

 

I loved the way it focused memory on the voice. The speech rhythms of the houses’ custodians then became associated with the images of the houses, and the interiors. This was effective and affective. (I will henceforth associate the image of the Christ statue with the rhythm of “pa-ra-ley-ley.”) This may seem odd, but it’s my perhaps poor way of describing the unique way of “seeing” you provoke here.

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Fragment of the Christ statue in Iulia Hasdeu’s castle in Câmpina (RO)

 

The phrase “specifically Romanian artistic tone” toward the end is wonderful. The voice is more universal than that, but it recapitulates the theme in a way that opens interpretation in more Hegelian aesthetic terms–if one is thus inclined–without forgetting the termite flame that burns at the edges of the screen/memory, either. Beautiful.

 

2) Love the association of spiritism and patriotism. Of the personality, or of the nation–even through the self-abnegating personality (the deathbed anecdote). Then the dichotomy “worldly love and spiritual love” comes with a nice resonance to that. Meaning also, I like the order of houses more here than when we were discussing it, it works fine!

 imagine 4

Photograph taken by Nicu Ilfoveanu in Nicolae Bălcescu village during filming

 

3) The custodians are interesting. Particularly, to me, the first and last. You can actually feel the weight of the memory they are charged with keeping, as they uphold it. Pindar’s translation of force into light. Standing out on this viewing were the first man’s thoughts on spiritism, Christianity and work; the second man’s Ceausescu anecdote (good question you asked); and the last woman’s dictation, which felt like a summation of one side of the film, if not of the whole question of memory as memorialization. You were right to say, “It’s very good like this.”

 

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The portrait of the first custodian Fred is mentioning (he was the guide at Iulia Hasdeu’s castle)

 

4) The last line that cancels out the beloved image/person, in a sense… Really, that’s a strong thing. It rips away the idea of reconciliation that underlies socialized memory, as history does, too. (Like being erased from the books.)  So! You’ve watched a tragedy? Comedy? Well, it’s a documentary about memory, so how could it be less than both? If the Athenians have slept through the explanation, it’s their own problem. In recompense, the wine has perhaps given them dreams.

 

Which they may or may not remember.

 

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Snapshot taken in the courtyard of Iulia Hasdeu’s memorial house /  The custodian in Nicolae Bălcescu’s memorial house talking about a game of chess and love

 

5) Throughout I loved the use of bird sounds. Which is obviously a whole other thing… brilliant.

I think it is quite a wonderful film.”

 

 

*

Nadav Avruch comes from Tel Aviv and currently lives in Chicago, where he is writing his PhD at the German department of the Northwestern University. In Chicago he got acquainted with Irina Botea and her work, and has been following it closely since. Nadav is drawn, among other things, to demons and ghosts in literature and film. In this context, we have asked him to share some of his thoughts about Film Postale.

 

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A painting depicting Hasdeu family – Mrs. And Mr. Hasdeu, meditative near the marble bust of their lost daughter, Iulia

 

“In memory of his beloved daughter Julia, having meticulously followed her dictations, as they came to him in a séance, B.P.Hasdeu built a castle, encapsulated by stained glass windows and filled with parallel mirrors. The castle is designed to contain and to preserve a fleeting presence, a chest of living memory, a medium. We as visitors, sight-seers, perhaps with a penchant for the past, enter this medium, a castle now turned museum, no, rather a treacherous theatrical medium, and we are being led from room to room, among assorted objects and artworks – stage props – by the entrusted guardian, a guide. Over and over, he recites his text uncannily, and warns us that the symbols of this castle should not be ridiculed, never, for those who have done so have met a horrible death. The paradox of the actor? We are frustrated ever more, with every step we take into the medium: the spirit of Julia watches over the castle from the other side, namely, it is not abandoned. But then the guardian addresses the camera, no longer piercing it with his vacant, ghostly stare, but instead takes us behind the scenes, to the surveillance cameras installed in the museum, watching over the castle, and almost mockingly, defiantly, he scouts for spirits. One medium turned into another medium, now, one turns against it. Who occupies the house, we ask, who haunts it? How many presences possess it? The guardian doesn’t even like Spiritism, he complains, he confesses in our ears awkwardly, why, because he was misled when he was first hired for the role, he didn’t know it was a museum (and what is a museum if not a collection of “deserted” possessions, dispossessed belongings?); he thought,rather, thatit was a deserted place (abandoned by the spirits, or rather left behind for them?); was he promised a place he could possess? Haunt? Clearly, you cannot haunt a haunted house, that much we know; and this place is not deserted, it is haunted, at least that is what THEY think. He on the other hand was chosen by the spirits, the spirits have hired him in the first place.”

*

This is the first in a series of newsletters focusing on the creative practice of the six artists featured in the exhibition Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt, one of the two official pavilions representing Romania at the 55th edition of La Biennale di Venezia.

The courtesy for all visual materials belongs to the artists.

 

 

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For our newsletter, Sebastian was kind enough to send us a series of preparatory drawings for his latest video – Conversations in Training Mode, sprinkled with dark humour and laconic observations.

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This is the second in a series of newsletters focusing on the creative practice of the six artists featured in the exhibition Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt, one of the two official pavilions representing Romania at the 55th edition of La Biennale di Venezia. 

The courtesy for all visual materials belongs to the artist.

Adi Matei


Titlu-73

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the third presentation in our series of newsletters, Olivia Mihălţianu agreed to talk about the dialectics of her long-term project – the Smoking Room – a combination between the rationality of specificity and the acrobatics of meditation.

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 *

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Smoking Room is a project about smoking and its cultural, social, economic and medical implications throughout time, highlighting the links between lifestyle and artistic creation.

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The setting of the project is a remake of the Golden Room, designed and decorated as “a room of her own” by Queen Marie of Romania and part of the Royal Palace built in 1902, an architectural ensemble situated in the Carpathian Mountains.

Marie was an iconic character – queen, diplomat, writer, artist, art collector, patron of the arts, soldier, nurse – who was also smoking in public, as shown in a short film from the early 1920s.

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It is a serial work about freedom of thought and expression, including, among others, the freedom of women smoking in public as a historic act and mark of emancipation. Each time it was shown, the Smoking Room had different connotations.

At Secession in Vienna, in 2010, the supplied free cigarettes were a restitution of a prohibited gesture (smoking ban in public spaces) and at the 55th Venice Biennale, the introduction of the take-away golden match was a transgression from a restricted to an open space: Giardini, Venice and the entire world.

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 Smoking Room is an aesthetic project that goes far beyond political correctness and contemporary social conventions. (Olivia Mihălţianu)

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Smoking Room_ptr mailSmoking Room, video still, full HD, 5’02”, 2013. Courtesy the artist

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02 Smoking RoomSmoking Room, video still, S8 transferred on DV Pal, 2:31, 2010

 

02 Smoking RoomSmoking Room, video still, S8 transferred on DV Pal, 2’18”, 2009

 01 Smoking RoomSmoking Room, detail from the exhibition “where do we go from here?”, Secession, Vienna, 2010

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03 Smoking RoomSmoking Room, (golden wallpaper and furniture, smoking utensils, cigarettes, monitors, variable dimensions), in the exhibition “where do we go from here?”, Secession, Vienna, 2010

04 smoking room

Smoking Room, (golden wallpaper and gilded furniture, Murano chandelier, golden matches, monitor), in the exhibition “Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt”, New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research, 55th edition of La Biennale di Venezia, 2013. Photo credit: Stefan Jammer 

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*

This is the third in a series of newsletters focusing on the creative practice of the six artists featured in the exhibition Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt, one of the two official pavilions representing Romania at the 55th edition of La Biennale di Venezia. The  exhibition took place between the 1st of June and the 24th of November 2013 at the New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research in Venice. For the next two months, in order to keep the spirit of the exhibition going, we will prepare further newsletters focused on the projects of Adi Matei, Karolina Bregula and Apparatus 22.   

The courtesy for all visual materials belongs to the artist.

Apparatus 22


Karolina Bregula


Anca Mihuleţ


news

We would like to keep you updated about future projects and exhibitions of the curator and participating artists.

If you wish to discover more on their practice, please sign up for a free subscription to our newsletter series:

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june-july-66

 

Apparatus 22


Time Cube, TIME MACHINE BIENNIAL OF CONTEMPORARY ART

D-0 ARK UNDERGROUND, Konjic, Bosnia & Herzegovina

*joint work with studioBASAR

curated by Basak Senova

April 26 – September 26

 

 

 

Impossibility vs. Self-Censorship

Center for Contemporary Creation Matadero, Madrid, Spain

The exhibition is part of the Curators’ Network public programme.

curated by Anca Mihuleţ and Borbála Szalai.

June 27 – July 28

www.mataderomadrid.org/ficha/2638/curator’s-network-’13.html

 

Irina Botea


Artist in residence at AIR-Krems

Krems an der Donau, Austria

June – July

 

Translating Impossible Projects workshop

Center for Contemporary Creation Matadero, Madrid, Spain

The workshop is part of the Curators’ Network public programme.

June 28

 

 

You Only Fall Twice at Centre for Contemporary Art Derry – Londonderry

Derry – Londonderry, Ireland

*with Nicu Ilfoveanu

curated by Beirut and FormContent

July 13 – August 18

 

 

 

 

 

Karolina Breguła


Artist in residence Art Quarter

Budapest, Hungary

May – August

 

Zine Spaces

Center for Contemporary Creation Matadero, Madrid, Spain

The exhibition is part of the Curators’ Network public programme.

Curated by Andrea Löbel and Jürgen Tabor

June 29 – July 14

 

 

Nicu Ilfoveanu


The Mistaken Present Tense

Solo show

Arsenal Gallery in Poznań, Poland

curated by Marta Smolinska

June 7 – June 30

 

You Only Fall Twice at Centre for Contemporary Art Derry – Londonderry

Derry – Londonderry, Ireland

*with Irina Botea

curated by Beirut and FormContent

July 13 – August 18

 

 

 

Adi Matei


Who Makes Europe

Center for Contemporary Creation Matadero, Madrid

Curated by Susanne Hinrichs

June 6 – July 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olivia Mihălţianu


GOOD GIRLS_MEMORY, DESIRE, POWER  

National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest, Romania

curated by Bojana Pejic

June 20 – September 27

 

artist in residence at AIR-Krems

Krems an der Donau, Austria

May- July

 

 

 

 

Winyan Kipanpi Win / The Woman Who Was Waited For

solo show

Factory, Kunsthalle Krems, Austria

curated by Alexandra Hennig

July 14 – September 29

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sebastian Moldovan


Impossibility vs. Self-Censorship

Center for Contemporary Creation Matadero, Madrid, Spain

The exhibition is part of the Curators’ Network public programme.

curated by Anca Mihuleţ and Borbála Szalai.

June 27 – July 28

www.mataderomadrid.org/ficha/2638/curator’s-network-’13.html

 

 

 

 

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Apparatus 22


Time Cube, TIME MACHINE BIENNIAL OF CONTEMPORARY ART

D-0 ARK UNDERGROUND, Konjic, Bosnia & Herzegovina

*joint work with studioBASAR

curated by Basak Senova

April 26 – September 26

 

“MANU FACTOR”

 Motorenhalle, Dresden, Germany

Curated by Denise Ackermann and Frank Eckhardt

September 18 – December 21

“The Emperor’s New Apparel”

TRAFO Gallery, Budapest, Hungary

Curated by Borbála Szalai

September 5 – October 20 


RSVP 03. Soft Method

Trago Gallery, Budapest, Hungary

Public talk: Apparatus 22 and Jaroslav Kyša

September 6, 6pm

 

 

 

 

 

Irina Botea


4th Athens Biennale 2013 AGORA

Athens, Greece

29 September 2013 – 1 December 2013

 

 

You Only Fall Twice at Centre for Contemporary Art Derry – Londonderry

Derry – Londonderry, Ireland

*with Nicu Ilfoveanu

curated by Beirut and FormContent

July 13 – August 18

 

 

Karolina Breguła


Views

Zachęta National Gallery – Warsaw, Poland

curated by Ewa Łączyńska-Widz and Jadwiga Sawicka

September 13 – November 17

 

 

Fire-Followers (screening)

Wyspa Instutute of Art – Gdańsk, Poland

curated by Aneta Szyłak

10 September

 

A sertes (screening)

CrossTalk Video Art Festival, Toldi Cinema – Budapest, Hungary, Ireland

curated by Szilvi Nemet

September 15

 

Obraza (screening)

Culture Workshops – Lublin, Poland

curated by Magdalena Ujma

September 26

 

Nicu Ilfoveanu


You Only Fall Twice at Centre for Contemporary Art Derry – Londonderry

Derry – Londonderry, Ireland

*with Irina Botea

curated by Beirut and FormContent

July 13 – August 18

 

 Bolyai Camp

Tg Mures, Romania

September 25 – 30

 

 

 

 

Adi Matei


Artist-in-Residence at quartier21

MuseumsQuartier, Vienna, Austria

September

 

 

 

 

 

Olivia Mihălţianu


GOOD GIRLS_MEMORY, DESIRE, POWER  

National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest, Romania

curated by Bojana Pejic

June 20 – September 27

 

Winyan Kipanpi Win / The Woman Who Was Waited For

solo show

Factory, Kunsthalle Krems, Austria

curated by Alexandra Hennig

July 14 – September 29

 

Sebastian Moldovan


HOTSPOT CLUJ – New Romanian Art

Arken Museum of Modern Art, Arken, Denmark

video-screening

September 25

 

 

 

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Apparatus 22


 The Emperor’s New Apparel”

TRAFO Gallery, Budapest, Hungary

Curated by Borbála Szalai

September 5 – October 20

 

“MANU FACTOR”, Motorenhalle

Dresden, Germany

Curated by Denise Ackermann and Frank Eckhardt

September 18 – December 21

 

 

“œconomy, an already tumultuous landscape where phantasms cross”

Oberwelt, Stuttgart, Germany

Curated by KILOBASE BUCHAREST

December 6 – 29, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irina Botea


 4th Athens Biennale 2013 AGORA

Athens, Greece

29 September 2013 – 1 December 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karolina Bregula


We are happy to announce that Karolina Bregula received the second prize of the prestigious „Views 2013 – Deutsche Bank Foundation Award” in Warsaw.

 

“Views” 

Zachęta National Gallery – Warsaw, Poland

curated by Ewa Łączyńska-Widz and Jadwiga Sawicka

September 13 – November 17

 

 

“Uprooted”,

BWA KATOWICE

Katowice, Poland
October 17 – 27

 

“KAROLINA BREGUŁA’S VIDEO ARCHIVE”

COLONY OF ARTISTS (WRZESZCZ ART! PROJECT - solo exhibition)

Gdańsk, Poland

October 19 – December 13

 

“WORKERS OF THE ARTWORLD UNITE”

CCA Kronika

Bytom, Poland

October 26 – December 7

 

 

Fire-Followers (Screening)

National Museum

Cracow, Poland

October 3

 

 

Fire-Followers (Screening)

Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle

Warsaw, Poland

October 11

 

 

Artist-in-Residence at RU Residency

NYC, USA

November – February 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adi Matei


”The world within – within the world”

Landskrona Art Gallery, Landskrona, Sweden

October 24 – December 15

 

“WHO MAKES EUROPE”

Städtische Galerie Bremen, Bremen, Germany

Curator: Susanne Hinrichs

December 8 – February 9, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

organizers






L_logo MFA

L_logo ICR Venetia

L_logo ICR

L_logo MC






Project coordination: Anca Mihulet and
Logo Add-52

add is a not-for-profit organization that since 2002 constantly supports through its programs young artists, progressive cultural organizations or creative industries initiatives;

Press: Erika Olea

Additional support for communication and fundraising: Oana Iordan


Coordination from Romanian Cultural Institute Bucharest: Irina Cornişteanu, Ortansa Ispas and Elena Iordache

English editor and proof reading: Laura Balomiri

Photo documentation and photo editing: Stefan Jammer

Graphic Design: Paramon Ditu at (acmeindustries.ro)

Site design: Andrei Marin

Exhibition technician: Stoyan Dechev

Space restoration: Ioan Achim Balaban


Sponsor:

Logo OMV-53

This seminal exhibition was made possible by the integrated, international oil and gas company OMV, which focuses its cultural sponsoring activities on cultural exchange in the area of contemporary art between the company’s core markets in Austria, Romania, and Turkey. This contribution by OMV produces cultural dialogue over and above its economic engagement in these regions. OMV is the majority shareholder of Petrom, the largest oil and gas producer in South Eastern Europe with headquarters in Bucharest.

With the additional support of:


Logo Add-52

Friends of the Exhibition:

Bitdefender    |    L’INTESA PROMOTIVE    |    Cramele Rotenberg    |    Fabrica de Sticla Avrig    |    SubSol Bar    |    donors who wish to remain anonymous.

Apparatus 22 received further generous support from Apparatus 22 Circle of Friends 2013 – 2014:
Stefania Magidson & Blue Heron Foundation    |    MATT DESIGN    |    Augustina & Ioan Dumitraşcu    |    Laura Paraschiv    |     The Ratiu Family Charitable Foundation    |    donors who wish to remain anonymous.

Irina Botea and Nicu Ilfoveanu received further generous support from School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC).

Karolina Bregula received further generous support from Istituto Polacco di Roma and Adam Mickiewicz Institute.

Olivia Mihălţianu received further generous support from Sogni di Cristallo and Match Point.

The entire team of the project Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt would like to thank all of its supporters.

Apparatus 22 would also like to thank to Oana Ailenei, Monica Bălașa, Anna Battista, Ioan Bârlădeanu, Alexandra Bogdan, Monica Joita, Hilde de Bruijn, Ioana Ulmeanu, KILOBASE BUCHAREST, Irina Bujor, Alexandru Costan, Matei David and Radu Lesevschi at ASAP Bucharest, Milos Jovanovic (stereosocks.com), Miruna Mirodontescu, Terezia and Marian Olea, ovaloval.com, Claudia Popa, Hili Perlson, Maria and Veronica Szabo, Sylvie Vaulet at Quartier Général.
Irina Botea & Nicu Ilfoveanu would also like to thank to Dragoş, Dan Rădulescu, Jenica Tabacu, Dana Rădulescu, familia Drăghici, Nadav Avruch, Geoffrey Alan Rhodes, Lisa Wainwright, Răzvan Botea, Cornelia Popa, Liviu Marghidan,  Matthias Regan, Fred Mecklenburg, Mirela & Gene Tanta, Mathew Paul Jinks, Nicolae Bănică-Ologu Bănică, Florica Nanu, Varban Liliana, Alvaro Botez, Gregg Bordowitz.
Karolina Bregula credit list for “Fire Followers” film: written and directed by Karolina Breguła | cinematography by Robert Mleczkosound editing by Weronika Raźna | editing by Stefan Paruch sound mixing by Nicolas Bredin | scenography by Patrycja Rabińska | production by Aleksandra Wojtaszek/touchFILMS and Atlas Sztuki Gallery.
Partners: Polish Institute in Stockholm, Polish Institute in Paris, Adam Mickiewicz Institute The film was partly financed from Polish The Ministry of Culture Scholarship.
Karolina sends love to family and friends who are constantly abandoned because of her work as well as thanks to everyone who made possible this exhibition.
Sebastian Moldovan would also like to thank to Jan Dhaese and Sasha Grey.

press





For further information, high-resolution images and press inquiries, please contact:

Erika OLEA
email: erika@reflectioncenterforsuspendedhistories.com
phone: 00 4 0723 172 850


Press Release (English)

Reflection Center for Suspended Histories. An Attempt

Press Release (Romanian)
Centru de reflectie pentru istorii suspendate. O incercare
Media & Crediting Info

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Address

New Gallery of the Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research
Campo Santa Fosca, Palazzo Correr, Cannaregio 2214, 30121 Venice

 

closest vaporetto stations:
Line 2 – San Marcuola (Casino)
Line 1 – San Marcuola (Casino) or Ca’d’Oro

 

Opening Hours

June, 1st – November, 24th 2013
Opening hours: 10:00 – 18:00
Closed on Mondays

 

Contact

info@reflectioncenterforsuspendedhistories.com
0040 724 331 201

Gallery contact:
0039 324 781 88 48



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